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USA - Women in America Report - Indicators of Well-Being
In support of the Council on Women and Girls, the Office of Management and Budget and the Economics and Statistics Administration within the Department of Commerce worked together to create the Women in America (pdf) report.

WUNRN

http://www.wunrn.com

Direct Link to Full 97-Page Report:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/rss_viewer/Women_in_America.pdf

http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cwg/data-on-women

Women in America: Indicators of Social & Economic Well-Being

In support of the Council on Women and Girls, the Office of Management and Budget and the Economics and Statistics Administration within the Department of Commerce worked together to create the Women in America (pdf) report which, for the first time in recent history, pulls together information from across the Federal statistical agencies to compile baseline information on how women are faring in the United States today and how these trends have changed over time.  The report provides a statistical portrait showing how women’s lives are changing in five critical areas:

By bringing together data from across the Federal government, the report is one of most comprehensive sources for information on women’s lives today. This is the first such federal initiative since 1963, when the Commission on Status of Women, established by President Kennedy and chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt, produced a report on the conditions of women.  This data initiative will allow government, non-government, and individual actors to craft appropriate responses to changing circumstances.  The initiative furthers three governance themes of the Obama Administration:  (1) pursuing evidence-based policymaking; (2) catalyzing the private sector, including private researchers, to partner with the government in analyzing data and formulating appropriate policies; and (3) pursuing an all-government and all-agency approach to addressing special issues affecting Americans.

Facts alone can never substitute for actions that directly address the challenges faced by women of all ages and backgrounds.  But facts are deeply important in helping to paint a picture of how the lives of American women are changing over time and in pointing toward the actions and policies that might be most needed.  Better understanding women’s social and economic well-being now and in the past will help generate ideas to help us all win the future. 

Download the full Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being (pdf) report.

Additional Resources

The Women in America report is accompanied by this website which compiles in one place some of the vast Federal statistical data concerning women. 

Federal data agencies release updated and new information regularly on their own websites; therefore, we encourage all interested parties to check for the latest information.  For the most recent information, please visit:

www.census.gov
www.nces.ed.gov
www.nsf.gov
www.bls.gov
www.cdc.gov/nchs
www.bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov

Below, we have compiled information relating to women veterans.

Women Veterans

 + 

  1. Population and Demographics
    1. Female Veteran Population Projections
    2. Projected Veteran Population (female percentage)
    3. Estimated Number of Female Veterans in U.S. and Puerto Rico
    4. Percentage Distribution of the Estimated Female and Male Veteran Population by Census Region
    5. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Marital Status and Gender
    6. Percentage Distribution of the Estimated Female and Male Veteran Population by Hispanic Origin and Race
    7. Percentage Distribution of Veterans by Period of Service and Gender
    8. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Combat, War Zone, or Exposure to Dead/Dying Wounded and Gender
    9. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Branch of Service, Gender, and Age

 + 

  1. Health
    1. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Status, Gender, and Age
    2. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Functional Limitation, Gender, and Age
    3. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Conditions, Gender, and Age
    4. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Type of Health Insurance, Gender, and Age (Less Than 65 Years and 65 Years or Older)
    5. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Source of Care, Type of Care, and Gender
    6. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Insurance Coverage of VA Health Care Users of Emergency Room, Outpatient Care, or Overnight Stays in Hospitals Only, Gender, and Age (Less Than 65 Years and 65 Years or Older)
    7. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Insurance Coverage of VA Health Care Users, Gender, and Age (Less Than 65 Years and 65 Years or Older)
    8. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Insurance Coverage of Non-VA Health Care Users of Emergency Room, Outpatient Care, or Overnight Stays  in Hospitals Only, Gender, and Age (Less Than 65 Years and 65 Years or Older)
    9. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Insurance Coverage of Non-VA Health Care Users, Gender, and Age (Less Than 65 Years and 65 Years or Older)
    10. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Reasons Veterans Didn't Use VA Health Care in Past 12 Months and Gender
    11. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Reasons for Never Using VA Health Care, Gender, and Age
    12. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Status, Gender, and Source of Care for Emergency Room, Outpatient Care, or Overnight Hospital Stays Only
    13. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Health Status, Gender, and Source of Care
    14. Veterans Receiving VA Disability Compensation by Disability Rating by Gender
    15. Percent Distribution of Veterans Receiving Service-connected Disability Compensation by Importance of Disability Payment in Meeting Needs, Degree of Disability, and Gender

 + 

  1. Veteran Benefits

 + 

    1. Home Ownership
      1. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Current Home Ownership, Gender, and Age
      2. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Current Home Ownership, Gender, and Marital Status
      3. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Current Home Ownership, Gender, and Income  

 + 

    1. Life Insurance
      1. Percent Distribution of Veterans by VA and Non-VA Life Insurance Coverage, Gender, and Age
      2. Percent Distribution of Veterans by Reasons Veterans Don't Have VA Life Insurance and Gender

 + 

    1. Education Benefits
      1. Percent Distribution of Veterans, Comparing Use of VA Education and Training Benefits and Non-VA Financial Assistance by Gender and Period of Service
      2. Percent Distribution of Veterans by How VA Education and Training Benefits Were Used, Gender, and Period of Service

People, Families, and Income

The Women in America report describes various demographic characteristics and trends in women’s marriage, living arrangements, childbearing, and poverty. The Census Bureau is the primary source of the data (census.gov).

As the report indicates in regard to people, families and income:

  • Women are marrying later and have fewer children than in the past.  A greater proportion of both women and men have never married, and women are giving birth to their first child at older ages.
  • Although more adult women live in married-couple families than in any other living arrangement, an ever-growing number of women are raising children without a spouse. 
  • More women are remaining childless, although eight out of ten adult women have children.
  • As the baby boom generation ages, a growing share of women – and men – are older. Because women live longer, women continue to outnumber men at older ages. 
  • Women are more likely to live in poverty than are adult men.  Single-mother families face particularly high poverty rates, often because of the lower wages earned by women in these families.

An overview of this section is available in the Women in America fact sheet (pdf).

For additional resources on these demographic topics relating to women, please visit the Census Information on Women.  

Below, we have compiled other relevant demographic statistics about American women. 

 + 

  1. Population
    1. Population by Age and Sex  (Table 1)
    2. Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population by age, sex, and race (Table 3 16)
    3. Race and Hispanic Origin by sex

 + 

    1. Prevalence of disability in the population, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Limitation in work activity due to health problems (Table 6)
    2. U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population 5 years old and older, by disability status, type of disability, sex, and age (Table A-3)

 + 

    1. Prevalence of poverty in the population, by gender (and other selected characteristics);
      1. Poverty status of population by sex and age (Table 21)
      2. Poverty status among adolescents 10–17 years of age, by family structure and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2005 (Figure 2)
      3. Age and Sex of All People, Family Members and Unrelated Individuals Iterated by Income-to-Poverty Ratio and Race
      4. Poverty Rates by Sex and Single Year of Age 2009

 + 

    1. Age at first marriage/ child:
      1. Marriage by age/race and Hispanic origin, (Figure 1)
      2. Probability of first marriage before a given age by sex, (Figure 2)
      3.  Probability of marriage before a given age by sex, race and Hispanic Origin, (Figure 3)
      4. Marital status of people 15 years and over by age, sex, personal earnings, race, and Hispanic origin in 2010 (Table A1)
      5. Average age of mother at first birth, 1970-2006 (Figure 1)
      6. Percentage of first births, by age of mother, 1970-2006 (Figure 2)
      7. Average age of mother at first birth, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, 1990 and 2006 (Figure 4)
      8. Average age of mother at first birth, selected countries, 1970 and 2006 (Figure 5)
      9. Women who had a child in the last year per 1000 women by race, Hispanic origin, nativity status and selected characteristics (June 2008) (Table 4)
      10. Women 15 to 44 with a birth in the last year by living arrangement, age and educational attainment (June 2008) (Table 10)

 + 

  1. Household type and family composition
    1. Adults by household type (including cohabitation) (Table 1-8, 15)
    2. Family status and household relationship of people 15 years and over, by marital status, age and sex: 2010 (Table A2)

Education

The Women in America report describes levels and trends in women’s educational attainment, school enrollment, and fields of study. The data are primarily from the National Center for Education Statistics (nces.ed.gov) or the National Science Foundation (nsf.gov).

As the report indicates in regard to education:

  • Women’s gains in educational attainment have significantly outpaced those of men over the last 40 years.  Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree.  Higher percentages of women than men have at least a high school education, and higher percentages of women than men participate in adult education.
  • Educational gains among women relative to men can be seen across racial and ethnic groups and this trend is also present in other developed countries. 
  • Despite these gains in graduation rates, differences remain in the relative performance of female and male students at younger ages, with girls scoring higher than boys on reading assessments and lower on math assessments. 
  • These differences can be seen in the fields that women pursue in college; female students are less well represented than men in science and technology-related fields, which typically lead to higher paying occupations. 


For additional resources on these education-related topics relating to women, please visit the National Center on Education Statistics or the National Science Foundation.

Other reports that provide detailed information about this topic include:

Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering

Science and Engineering Indicators 2010 (pdf)

Below, we have compiled other relevant statistics about the education status of American women. 

 + 

  1. Education Level

 + 

    1. Highest education level attained, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Number of persons age 18 and over, by highest level of education attained, age, sex, and race/ethnicity (Table 9)
      2. Percentage of persons age 25 and over and 25 to 29, by race/ethnicity, years of school completed, and sex: Selected years, 1910 through 2009 (Table 8)

 + 

    1. Participation in higher education, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Percentage of high school completers who were enrolled in 2- or 4-year colleges the October immediately following high school completion, by sex and type of institution (Table A-20-4)
      2. Enrollment of first-time, first-year undergraduate students at all institutions, by race/ethnicity, citizenship, sex, and enrollment status
      3. Undergraduate enrollment at 2-year institutions, by race/ethnicity, citizenship, sex, and enrollment status
      4. Undergraduate enrollment at 4-year institutions, by race/ethnicity, citizenship, sex, and enrollment status
      5. Undergraduate enrollment status, by sex, race/ethnicity, citizenship, institutional control, and enrollment status

 + 

    1. National standardized testing results, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. SAT mean scores of college-bound seniors, by sex: 1966-67 through 2008-09 (Table 144)
      2. ACT score averages and standard deviations, by sex and race/ethnicity, and percentage of ACT test takers, selected composite score ranges and planned fields of study: Selected years, 1995 through 2009 (Table 147)

 + 

  1. Kind of higher education institution (community college, public university, other
    1. Enrollment, staff, and degrees conferred in postsecondary institutions participating in Title IV programs, by level and control of institution, sex of student, and type of degree (Table 187)

 + 

  1. Major area of study

 + 

    1. Major areas of study, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Persons age 18 and over who hold at least a bachelor’s degree in specific fields of study, by sex, race/ethnicity, and age (Table 10)
      2. Associates Degree by sex and field:1997-2006
      3. Associate's degrees, by field, citizenship, and race/ethnicity: 1997–2006
      4. Bachelor's degrees, by sex and field
      5. Bachelor’s degrees by sex and field with field broken out: 1997-2006
      6. Degrees awarded in all fields, by degree level and sex of recipient (Table 2)
      7. Bachelor's degrees, by race/ethnicity, citizenship, sex, and field: 2006
      8. Bachelor’s degrees awarded in engineering, by sex, race/ethnicity, and citizenship
      9. Doctoral degrees awarded in S&E and non-S&E fields to U.S. citizens and permanent residents
      10. Historical summary of faculty, students, degrees, and finances in degree-granting institutions: Selected years, 1869–70 through 2007–08 (Table 188)
      11. Occupation of employed persons 25 years old and over, by educational attainment and sex (Table 383)
      12. Definite post-graduation plans of U.S.-citizen and permanent-resident S&E doctoral degree recipients, by major field, sex, and location

 + 

  1. STEM Education
    1. Percentage of public and private high school graduates taking selected mathematics and science courses in high school, by sex and race/ethnicity (Table 151)

 + 

    1. Share of STEM degrees going to women
      1. Science and engineering degrees awarded, by degree level and sex of recipient (Table 3)
      2. Female share of S&E graduate students, by field: 1996 and 2006 (Figure D-1)
      3. Distribution of Bachelor’s Degrees by Field and Sex (Tables 7-10)
      4. Distribution of Master’s Degrees by Field and Sex (Tables 14-18)
      5. Distribution of Doctoral Degrees by Field and Sex (Tables 21-25)

 + 

    1. STEM Achievement
      1. Average mathematics scale scores of 8th-graders, by selected student and school characteristics: Selected years, 1990 through 2009 (Table A-12-2)
      2. Average science scale scores and percentage of 4th-, 8th-, and 12th-graders attaining science achievement levels, byselected student characteristics and percentile (Table 140)

 + 

    1. STEM degrees conferred
      1. Number of Bachelor’s degrees conferred by degree granting-institutions, by sex, race/ethnicity, and field of study (Table 285)
      2. Women in STEM doctoral programs (Table 1)

 + 

  1. Job-related training

 + 

    1. Adult Education
      1. Participation in Career-related training, by sex (Table 370)

 + 

  1. Financial assistance for education and debt burden for education
    1. Percentage of Undergraduates receiving different types of financial aid by sex, income, and full- or part-time status. (Table 338)
    2. Primary source of support for full-time S&E graduate students, by sex and field
    3. Primary source of support for U.S.-citizen and permanent-resident S&E doctorate recipients, by field and sex

Employment

The Women in America report describes levels and trends in women’s employment, earnings, and time use. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is the main source of the data (bls.gov).

As the report indicates in regard to employment:

  • The participation of women in the workforce rose dramatically through the mid-1990s, but has been relatively constant since then. 
  • Workforce participation among men has declined, but women are still less likely to work in the paid labor force than are men.  When women do work, they are much more likely than men to work part-time. 
  • Women continue to spend more of their time in household activities or caring for other family members; they also do more unpaid volunteer work than men.
  • Despite their gains in labor market experience and in education, women still earn less than men. 
  • In part, this is because women and men work in different occupations, with women still concentrated in lower-paying and traditionally female occupations. 
  • Because women earn less and because two-earner households have higher earnings, families headed by women have far less income than do married-couple families.

For additional resources on these employment-related topics relating to women, please visit the Bureau of Labor Statistics - Women.

For information about assets and wealth of American households, including those headed by females, please visit: IRS Personal Wealth Statistics, Federal Reserve Board Survey of Consumer Finances, U.S. Census Survey of Income and Program Participation, or the Bureau of Economic Analysis

Other reports that provide detailed information about this topic include:

Highlights of Women’s Earnings in 2009 (pdf)

Volunteering in the United States 2010 (pdf)

American Time Use Survey 2009 (pdf)

Below, we have compiled other relevant statistics about the employment status of American women.

 + 

  1. Labor market participation

 + 

    1. Employment rate, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population by age and sex and race, 2009 annual averages (Table 3)
      2. Employment status of the foreign-born and native-born populations 25 years and over by educational attainment, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 2008-09 annual averages (Table 4)
      3. Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and over by sex, 1973 to date (Table 2)
      4. Employment status of the Hispanic or Latino population by age and sex (Table 3)
      5. Employment status by marital status and sex, 2008 annual averages (Table 4)
      6. Employment status of the population by sex, marital status, and presence and age of own children under 18, 2008-09 annual averages (Table 5)

 + 

    1. Economic activity of women after childbirth
      1. Families with own children: Employment status of parents by age of youngest child and family type, 2008-09 annual averages (Table 4)
      2. Employment status of the population by sex, marital status, and presence and age of own children under 18 (Table 5)

 + 

  1. Working patterns

 + 

    1. Full-time and part-time work, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Employed persons by full- and part-time status and sex, 1970-2008 annual averages (Table 20)

 + 

    1. Flexible working patterns (availability)
      1. Flexible schedules: Full-time wage and salary workers by selected characteristics, May 2004 (Table 30)
      2. Job related work at home on primary job (Table 31)
      3. Employed persons working  at home and at their workplace and time spent working at each location (Table 6)

 + 

    1. Multiple jobs
      1. Multiple jobholders and multiple jobholding rates by sex and race 1970-2008 (Table 35)

 + 

  1. Industrial sector and occupation

 + 

    1. Female employees by industry sector (and male employees by industry sector as a comparison)
      1. Employed women 16 years and older as a percentage of selected occupations (Figure H-1)
      2. Employed persons by detailed industry, sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity (Table 18)

 + 

    1. Proportion of those in employment who are self-employed
      1. Unincorporated self-employed persons in nonagricultural industries by sex, 1976–2009 (Table 33)

 + 

    1. Participation in STEM fields (SRS)
      1. Women scientists and engineers and managers in business or industry (Figure H-4)
      2. Full-time employed science, engineering, and health doctorate holders, by sex, field of doctorate, and employment (Table 3)
      3. Science, engineering, and health doctorate holders employed full time in academic institutions, by selected demographic characteristics (Table 4)
      4. Women as a Percentage of full-time tenured/tenure0track faculty by field (Table 5)
      5. Employed scientists and engineers, by occupation, highest degree level, and sex (Table H-5)
      6. Employed scientists and engineers, by occupation, highest degree level, race/ethnicity, and sex (Table H-7)

 + 

  1. Union membership
    1. Union affiliation of employed wage and salary workers by sex, annual averages, 1983-2008 (Table 38)
    2. Union affiliation of employed wage and salary workers by selected characteristics (Table 1)

 + 

  1. Voluntary and Community Activities

 + 

    1. Volunteering by type of activity carried out
      1. Volunteers by type of main organization for which volunteer activities were performed and selected characteristics, September 2009 (Table 4)
      2. Main volunteer activity for main organization for which activities were performed and selected characteristics, September 2009 (Table 5)
      3. Volunteers by how they became involved with main organization for which volunteer activities were performed and selected characteristics (Table 6)

 + 

    1. Participation in voluntary and community activities within the last 12 months by gender (and other selected characteristics)
      1. Volunteers by selected characteristics, September 2009 (Table 1)

 + 

  1. Use of Time

 + 

    1. Recreational, social, and leisure activities
      1. Time spent in leisure and sports activities for the civilian population by selected characteristics, 2008 annual averages (Table 11)

 + 

  1. Women as caretakers

 + 

    1. Overall
      1. Time spent in detailed primary activities, and percent of the civilian population engaging in each detailed activity category, averages per day by sex (Table A-1)
      2. Time spent in detailed primary activities, and percent of the civilian population engaging in each detailed primary activity category, averages per day on weekdays and weekends (Table A-2)

 + 

    1. Women as caretakers
      1. Time spent in primary activities  for the civilian population 18 years and over by employment status, presence and age of youngest household child, and sex, 2008 annual averages ( Table 8)
      2. Time spent caring for household children under 18 by sex of adult 1 and age of youngest child by day of week, average for the combined years 2004-08 (Table 9)
      3. Time spent providing secondary childcare for household children under 13 by sex of adult and age of youngest child by day of week (Table 10)
      4. Time spent in primary activities and the percent of married mothers and fathers who did the activities on an average day by employment status and age of youngest own household child (Table A-6)
      5. Time spent in primary activities by married mothers and fathers with own household children under 18 by employment status of self and spouse and age of youngest child (Table A-7)
      6. Charts by topic: Care of household children (by adults living in households with children)

 + 

  1. Financial Resources and Access to Services

 + 

    1. Wages and Earnings

 + 

      1. Median usual weekly earnings for full-time workers, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
        1. Median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 2009 annual averages (Chart 2)
        2. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, in current dollars, by sex and age, 1979–2009 annual averages (Table 12)
        3. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, in constant (2008) dollars, by sex and age, 1979–2009 annual averages (Table 13)
        4. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, in current dollars, by sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 1979–2009 annual averages (Table 14)
        5. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, in constant (2009) dollars, by sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 1979–2009 annual averages (Table 15)
        6. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers 25 years and over by educational attainment and sex, 2009 annual averages (Table 17)
        7. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by industry and sex, 2009 annual averages (Table 19)
        8. Women’s earnings as a percent of men’s, full-time wage and salary workers, 1979–2009 annual averages (Chart 1)

 + 

      1. Distribution of full-time workers’ wages, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
        1. Distribution of full-time wage and salary employment, by sex and major occupation group, 2009 annual averages (Chart 4)
        2. Distribution of full-time wage and salary workers, by usual weekly earnings and selected characteristics, 2009 annual averages (Table 7)

 + 

      1. Median hourly earnings of workers paid by the hour, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
        1. Median hourly earnings of wage and salary workers paid hourly rates, by selected characteristics, 2009 annual averages (Table 9)

 + 

      1. Distribution of hourly earnings of workers paid by the hour, by gender (and other selected characteristics)
        1. Distribution of wage and salary workers paid hourly rates, by hourly earnings and selected characteristics, 2009 annual averages (Table 10)

 + 

      1. STEM
        1. Median annual salary of scientists and engineers employed full time, by highest degree, broad occupation, age, and sex: 2006 (Table H-16)
        2. Median STEM salary by field of bachelor’s degree and selected (Table H-13)
        3. Primary education/employment status and median salary of 2003, 2004, and 2005 science, engineering, and health master's degree recipients, by field of master's degree, sex, race/ethnicity, and disability status (Table H-14)
        4. Employment status and median salary of 2003, 2004, and 2005 science, engineering, and health doctoral degree recipients, by broad field of doctorate, sex, race/ethnicity, and disability status (Table H-15)

 + 

    1. Use of government services and benefits

 + 

      1. Claimants of key benefits
        1. Percentage of current beneficiary women aged 62–64 receiving Social Security benefits, by type of benefit: December 1984, 1994, and 2004 (Chart 9)
        2. Percentage of women aged 55–64 who ever had a pension, by pension type: 1994 and 2004(Chart 8)
        3. Average retired-worker benefits for current beneficiaries aged 62–64, by sex: 1984, 1994, and 2004 (Chart 10)
        4. Percentage of people aged 55–64 with employer-based retiree health insurance, by sex: 1994 and 2004 (Chart 11)

Health

The Women in America report describes levels and trends in women’s life expectancy, prevalence of chronic health conditions, access to health care, and health insurance coverage.  The data come primarily from the National Center for Health Statistics (cdc.gov/nchs).

As the report indicates in regard to health:

  • Life expectancy has increased over time for both women and men; however, women continue to live longer than men. 
  • Women are disproportionately more likely than men to be affected by certain critical health problems, including mobility impairments, chronic health conditions such as asthma, arthritis, or depression.  Women are less likely to be physically active and are more likely to be obese.  Females age 12 and older are more likely than males to report experiencing depression.
  • Women continue to have a lower incidence of heart disease than men and are less likely than men to suffer from diabetes.
  • Women generally use the health care system and preventive care more than men, but many women still do not receive recommended preventive care such as pap smears or flu vaccinations.
  • The share of both adult women and men without health insurance has increased over time. People with insurance are much more likely to have a doctor or other medical professional who provides regular care; one out of seven women have no usual source of health care.

For additional resources on health topics relating to women, please visit the Health, United States, 2010 Report.

Below, we have compiled other relevant statistics about the health status of American women.

 + 

  1. Life expectancy
    1. Life expectancy at birth, at 65 years of age, and at 75 years of age, by race and sex
    2. Life expectancy at birth and 65 years of age international rankings: OECD countries

 + 

  1. Mortality
    1. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother
    2. Infant mortality rates and international rankings: OECD countries
    3. Death rates by cause of death
    4. Leading causes of death and numbers of death by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (1980 and 2007)
    5. Maternal mortality for complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium

 + 

  1. Fertility and Natality

 + 

    1. Fertility and childbirth
      1. Crude birth rates, fertility rates, and birth rates, by age, race, and Hispanic origin of mother
      2.  Teenage childbearing, by race and Hispanic origin of mother
      3. Nonmarital childbearing, by race, Hispanic origin of mother, and maternal age
      4. Low birthweight live births among mothers 20 years of age and over, by detailed race, Hispanic origin and education of mother

 + 

    1. Average age of mothers giving birth
      1. Average age of mothers at first birth (Figure 1)
      2. Average age of mother at first birth, by race and Hispanic origin of mother (Figure 4)

 + 

    1. Breastfeeding
      1. Breastfeeding by year of baby’s birth and selected characteristics of mother

 + 

  1. Health Conditions

 + 

    1. Obesity
      1. Obesity, overweight and healthy weight among adults
      2. Obesity among adults (interactive database)
      3. Obesity among children 2-19
      4. Obesity among children (interactive database)

 + 

    1. Hypertension
      1. Hypertension and elevated blood pressure among adults
      2. Hypertension among adults (interactive database)

 + 

    1. Diabetes
      1. Diabetes among adults by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin
      2. Diabetes among adults (interactive database)

 + 

    1. Pain
      1. Joint paint among adults among adults
      2. Severe headache or migraine, low back pain, and neck pain among adults

 + 

  1. Behaviors impacting health

 + 

    1. Cigarette smoking
      1. Cigarette smoking among men, women, and high school students (Figure 11)
      2. Mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, by selected characteristics
      3. Cigarette smoking (interactive database)

 + 

    1. Excess drinking
      1. Heavy and binge drinking among adults

 + 

    1. Physical activity
      1. Participation in leisure-time aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities
      2. Physical activity among students in grades 9–12
      3. Physical activity (interactive database)

 + 

    1. Drug use
      1. Use of selected substances in past month by age, sex, and race
      2. Use of selected substances in past month by high school seniors, 10th graders, and 8th graders

 + 

    1. Other health risks among adolescents
      1. Health risk behaviors among students in grades 9–12, by sex, grade level, race, and Hispanic origin

 + 

  1. Use of health services and preventative health services

 + 

    1. Inpatient and outpatient data
      1. Discharges, days of care, and average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by selected characteristics

 + 

    1. Cancer screenings
      1. Use of mammography within past 2 years among women 40 years of age and over, by race and Hispanic origin
      2. Use of Pap smears among women by selected characteristics

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    1. Other preventative care (physicals, other screenings)
      1. Influenza vaccination s among adults, by selected characteristics

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    1. Prenatal healthcare
      1. Prenatal care for live births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother

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  1. Sexual health

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    1. Contraceptive use
      1. Contraceptive use among never-married female adolescents 15–19 years of age who have had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months, by method used  (Table 15)
      2. Contraceptive use in the past month among women 15–44 years of age, by age, race, Hispanic origin, and method of contraception

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    1. Abortion
      1. Legal abortions and legal abortion ratios, by selected patient characteristics

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    1. Sexually transmitted diseases
      1. Chlamydia—Rates: Total and by sex
      2. Chlamydia—Age- and sex-specific rates
      3. Gonorrhea—Rates: Total and by sex
      4. Gonorrhea—Age- and sex-specific rates
      5. Primary and secondary syphilis—Rates: Total and by sex and male-to-female rate ratios
      6. Primary and secondary syphilis—Age- and sex-specific rates
      7. Sexually transmitted disease rates in adolescents and young adults

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  1. Mental Health

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    1. Depression
      1. Depression among adults  (Figure 12)

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    1. Suicide rates
      1. Death rates for suicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age
      2. High School Students Reporting Considering, Planning, or Attempting Suicide in the Past 12 Months, by Sex

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  1. Health care access and use

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    1. Health care access
      1. No usual source of health care among adults 18-64 years of age, by selected characteristics
      2. Reduced access to medical care, dental care, and prescription drugs during the past 12 months due to cost, by selected characteristics

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    1. Health care use
      1. Health care visits to doctor offices, emergency departments, and home visits within the past 12 months by selected characteristics
      2. Visits to primary care generalist and specialist physicians, by selected characteristics and type of physician

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  1. Health care expenses, health insurance and sources of payment
    1. Expenses for health care and prescribed medicine, by selected characteristics
    2. Sources of payment for health care, by selected characteristics
    3. No health insurance coverage among persons under 65 years of age, by selected characteristics
    4. Private health insurance coverage among persons under 65 years of age, by selected characteristics

Crime/Violence

The Women in America report describes levels and trends in women’s victimization, crime, and involvement in the criminal justice system. The data come primarily from the Bureau of Justice Statistics (bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov).

As the report indicates in regard to crime and violence:

  • Women are less likely than men to be victims of crime.  As overall crime rates have fallen in the United States, the likelihood of victimization has declined. 
  • The probability of being a victim of a violent crime (assault, robbery, or homicide) has declined among both men and women in the last two decades. 
  • Attacks on women by their intimate partners have fallen since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994, although women are still much more likely to be victimized and injured by this type of violence than are men. 
  • Females made up 70% of victims killed by an intimate partner in 2007, a proportion that has changed very little since 1993.  Intimate partners were responsible for 3% of all violence against males and 23% of all violence against females in 2008. 
  • Although rape is considered to be underreported, reported rape rates have declined over time.
  • The majority of rapes were committed by someone known to the victim, primarily an acquaintance. 
  • Women are at far greater risk than men for stalking victimization.
  • Women are more likely to commit crimes now than in the past, although women who commit crimes are more likely to be arrested for nonviolent property crimes compared to male criminals whose crimes are more likely to involve violence. 
  • During the past two decades, imprisonment rates have risen for both men and women, although the share of women in prison is still much lower.  Like their male counterparts, black and Hispanic women are much more likely to experience imprisonment than white women. Many imprisoned women have minor children.

Other reports that provide detailed information about this general topic include:

Criminal Victimization in the United States 2007 (pdf)

Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence (pdf)

Below, we have compiled other relevant statistics about the crime and violence affecting American women.

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  1. Violence against Women

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    1. Number of violent crimes against women (and by way of contrast, by men)
      1. Number of victimizations and victimization rates for persons age 12 and over, by type of crime and gender of victims (Table 2)
      2. Victimization rates for persons age 12 and over, by gender and age of victims and type of crime (Table 4)
      3. Percentage Distribution of Victims by Victim Gender,  Type of Victimization,  and Perpetrator Gender (Exhibit 28, 29)

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  1. Type of violent incidents
    1. Victimization rates for persons age 12 and over, by gender and age of victims and type of crime (Table 4)
    2. Percentage and number of women and men who were raped in lifetime and previous 12 months (Exhibit 1)
    3. Dating violence and being forced to have sexual intercourse among students in grades 9–12, by gender and grade level: United States, 2005 (Figure 19)

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  1. Prevalence and type of sexual assault
    1. Percentage of women and men who were victims of a completed versus attempted rape in lifetime (Exhibit 3)
    2. Percentage distribution of female and male rape victims by type of rape experienced (Exhibit 5)
    3. Percentage distribution of female and male rape victims by age at time of first rape (Exhibit 10)
    4. Percentage distribution of female and male rape victims by characteristics of the rape (Exhibit 17)

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  1. Proportion of women experiencing intimate partner violence
    1. Persons Victimized by an Intimate Partner in Lifetime and in Previous 12 Months, by Type of Victimization and Gender (Exhibit 1)
    2. Persons Physically Assaulted by an Intimate Partner in Lifetime, by Type of Assault and Victim Gender (Exhibit 3)
    3. Persons Victimized by an Intimate Partner in Lifetime, by Victim Gender, Type of Victimization, and White/Nonwhite Status of Victim (Exhibit 5)
    4. Persons Victimized by an Intimate Partner in Lifetime, by Victim Gender, Type of Victimization, and Victim Race (Exhibit 6)
    5. Persons Victimized by an Intimate Partner in Lifetime, by Victim Gender, Type of Victimization, and Hispanic/Non-Hispanic Origin of Victim (Exhibit 7)

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  1. Prevalence and type of violence
    1. Distribution of Rape and Physical Assault Victims, by Frequency and Duration of Victimization and Gender (Exhibit 11) 

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  1. Prevalence and type of stalking
    1. Perceived gender of the stalking or harassment offender, by victim gender (Table 4)
    2. Characteristics of Stalking and Harassment Victims (Table 3)
    3. Victim-Offender Relationship in Stalking and Harassment (Table 5)

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  1. Relationship of victim to perpetrator
    1. Percentage distribution of female and male rape  victims by victim-perpetrator relationship (Exhibit 13)
    2. Percentage of women and men who were raped in lifetime by victim-perpetrator relationship (Exhibit 14)
    3. Percentage distribution of child, adolescent, and adult rape victims by victim-perpetrator relationship and victim gender (Exhibit 15)
    4. Percentage distribution of female former intimate partner rape victims by point in relationship when rape(s) occurred (Exhibit 16)
    5. Percentage Distribution of Adult Victims of Violence by Victim-Perpetrator Relationship and Victim Gender: All Types of Victimization (Exhibit 26)
    6. Percentage Distribution of Adult Rape and Physical Assault Victims by Victim-Perpetrator Relationship and Victim Gender (Exhibit 27)
    7. Type of violent crime, by victim-offender relationship and sex of victim, 1994 (Table 4)

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  1. Costs of Violence against Women

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    1. Use of health services by victims of domestic violence and sexual assault
      1. Average Annual Injury and Medical Utilization Estimates for Adult Victims of Intimate Partner Rape and Physical Assault, by Gender (Exhibit 15)
      2. Estimated Medical Care Service Use and Unit Costs for Nonfatal Intimate Partner Rape Against U.S. Adult Women, 1995 (Table 8)
      3. Distribution of Primary Source of Payment for Medical Care Resulting from Nonfatal Intimate Partner Rape and Physical Assault Against U.S. Adult Women, 1995 (Table 9)
      4. Estimated Medical Care Service Use and Unit Costs for Nonfatal Intimate Partner Physical Assault Against U.S. Adult Women (Table 10)
      5. Distribution of Primary Source of Payment for Mental Health Care Resulting from Intimate Partner Rape, Physical Assault, and Stalking Against U.S. Adult Women, 1995 (Table 11)

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  1. Social and Economic costs of violence
    1. Percentage distribution of female and male rape victims by mental health and lost productivity outcomes (Exhibit 20)
    2. Estimated Lost Productivity Among U.S. Adult Female Victims of Nonfatal Intimate Partner Violence, by Victimization Type and by Time Lost from Paid Work and Household Chores, 1995 (Table 7)
    3. Estimated Total Costs of intimate Partner Violence Against U.S. Adult Women, 1995 (Table 12)

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  1. Use of criminal justice system
    1. Distribution of Intimate Partner Rape, Physical Assault, and Stalking Victims, by Law Enforcement Outcomes and Gender (Exhibit 16)
    2. Distribution of Intimate Partner Rape, Physical Assault, and Stalking Victims, by Prosecution Outcomes and Gender (Exhibit 18)
    3. Distribution of Intimate Partner Rape, Physical Assault, and Stalking Victims, by Protective Order Outcomes and Gender (Exhibit 19)
    4. Percentage distribution of female rape victims by justice system outcomes and whether rapist was intimate or nonintimate (Exhibit 21)
    5. Percentage distribution of female victims who did not report rape to the police by reason for not reporting (Exhibit 22)
    6. Whether Stalking or Harassment Victims Took Actions to Protect Themselves or Stop Unwanted Behaviors (Table 8)
    7. Types of Help Sought by Stalking or Harassment Victims (Table 9)
    8. Percent of Stalking and Harassment Victimizations Reported to the Police, by victim gender (Table 14)